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Laparoscopic hernia repair with patients tissue graft as a natural mesh?

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  • Laparoscopic hernia repair with patients tissue graft as a natural mesh?

    This might be a crazy idea, but:

    Would it be possible to harvest a strip of patients own muscle from somewhere like the leg or buttocks, and then use that patients muscle tissue as a natural mesh to cover the hernia from a laparoscopic perspective?

    I understand that tissue grafts are used in other medical and surgical procedures, and the Desarda open hernia repair sort of uses a tissue graft approach (I could be misunderstood about Desarda), so why not graft a patients own native tissues to cover a hernia through the laparoscopic approach?

    Has anyone tried this before? Is there a technical reason it would not be feasible?





  • #2
    Itís a good question. When going for ďfemaleĒ surgery, I did everything to avoid mesh due to the serious complications from it. My surgeon used a strip from my abdomen - which ultimately caused the femoral hernia issues I now have. Iíve ironically needed mesh for one side already and will need to do the other side very soon. I opted out of tissue from my leg or other areas for my original surgery because I learned that many people commonly suffered from disfiguring and physical harm with that option. I did not do the original surgery laparoscopically though - and that could have made all the difference in developing my hernias. My surgeon was an old school surgeon and otherwise did a great job. At the time I had little options for surgeons who would do surgery without mesh for my first surgery - so I felt he was my best bet.

    So far - 2.5 years out - I am doing fine with my first femoral hernia surgery with a light weight mesh performed by Dr Brian Jacobs. The type of mesh is listed in my past postings. I do have slight sensations of mesh in my hernia area - but really nothing to complain about. I do feel that my body has had a reaction to having it in me - but again, it is so extremely slight - and I donít have the big concerns of constantly worrying my family that I have to go for an emergency surgery at a local hospital where I wouldíve lost all the benefits of an elective surgery with a dr of my choosing. Towards the end, my hernia would bulge to the size of a large grapefruit and cause considerable pain and worry. Femoral hernias, unlike inguinal hernias, require mesh - as I learned they are more likely to recur and up the chances of nerve damage due to repeated surgeries. In addition, they are more like to strangulate - so it is best not to delay the surgery when it becomes necessary. I was around 115 pounds at the time of my surgery and was in good physical shape, so it was not an issue of weight or not exercising. Deciding to get mesh was difficult. But ultimately it was necessary in my situation.

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    • #3
      I think k itís a great question. As seeker said this is what they used to do for incontinence issues instead of mesh.
      one would also think with the development of stem cell therapy that this can play a huge role in hernia surgery going forward.

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      • #4
        Just to clarify - my first surgery wasnít for incontinence.

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        • #5
          Tensor fascia lata grafts are how native tissue grafts used to be used prior to invention of cadaver Biologics. It is still used but rarely. Itís a highly morbid operation with many complications, pain, risk for nerve injury, cosmetic deformity, long recovery, and disability.
          #ItsNotJustAHernia
          www.BeverlyHillsHerniaCenter.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by drtowfigh View Post
            Tensor fascia lata grafts are how native tissue grafts used to be used prior to invention of cadaver Biologics. It is still used but rarely. Itís a highly morbid operation with many complications, pain, risk for nerve injury, cosmetic deformity, long recovery, and disability.
            Interesting and good to know, thank you for adding a clinical perspective on this.

            Perhaps growing suitable replacement tissue using a patients own stem cells would be the dream solution? I hope someone is working on this.

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