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Can I fat containing Hernia become / turn into a intestine containing hernia?

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  • Can I fat containing Hernia become / turn into a intestine containing hernia?

    drtowfigh ,
    ​​​Can I fat containing Hernia become / turn into an intestine containing hernia?
    Last edited by Mariel; 04-14-2019, 04:57 PM.

  • #2
    This is a great question. Wanting to know myself. I hope the dr's on here can answer. thank u !!@

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    • #3
      I think that anything behind the defect that is soft and squishy can get pushed through the defect by just hydraulic pressure. Whatever happens to be by the hole when the abdominal pressure increases. Intestine and omentum are what usually get pushed through. Omentum is a thick fold of peritoneum. It's actually a thing unto itself. It seems that it's not well understood either. Some sources call it "fat". I think that what surgeons sometimes tell you is "fat" is probably omentum. It might actually play a big part in the mesh reactions, if what I've read is on target. Maybe some device researchers will make that connection and be able to use it.

      Might not answer your question, but I thought I'd give it a shot. I'm pretty sure that my damaged omentum is part of the belt of stiff "fat" that has been left behind at my belt line after my mesh removal. Hopefully it will soften up over time.

      http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-.../#.XMKA_BbQiiQ

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4723480/



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      • #4
        As the hole gets bigger, yes.
        #ItsNotJustAHernia
        www.BeverlyHillsHerniaCenter.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by drtowfigh View Post
          As the hole gets bigger, yes.
          Curious, any meaningful difference in likelihood of this occurring in direct vs. indirect?

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          • #6
            Is your painless fat containing hernia indirect, direct, or both?

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            • #7
              UhOh! indirect hernias are more likely to incarcerate contents than direct hernias. And overall the risk is low.
              #ItsNotJustAHernia
              www.BeverlyHillsHerniaCenter.com

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              • #8
                That's a very nice question.

                IMO that has a lot to do with hernia sac, something one can hardly find information (in Pubmed one finds almost nothing) but that may be crucial in hernia formation and consequently hernia repair.

                The only information I could find so far was from Dr. Kang's site:

                A hernia sac is formed due to the exit of peritoneum through a gap in the abdominal wall muscle. After exiting through the gap, the peritoneum inflates like a balloon; thus explaining the name, hernia sac. Generally, during indirect inguinal hernia surgery, the hernia sac is separated from the surrounding tissue then tied up where it connects to the peritoneum and then the “sac” is trimmed off. After all that, the tied up, trimmed off part is pushed back in through the muscle gap.

                Through extensive surgical experience, we have found that in order to prevent hernia recurrence, it is crucial to push it deep back inside. But unfortunately, previous retroperitoneal repairs did not pay close attention to this step. Properly dealing with the hernia sac is very much important in direct inguinal hernia surgery as well.
                Maybe hernia sac formation is the crucial step for hernia to develop. That could be why people with defective internal inguinal rings take decades to develop an hernia even though the defect is there since birth. Also in children it's enough to repair hernia sac for hernia to be cured.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by drtowfigh View Post
                  UhOh! indirect hernias are more likely to incarcerate contents than direct hernias. And overall the risk is low.
                  Does that mean that one is more or less likely to have intestine eventually enter what was once a fat-only sac? Thanks

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                  • #10
                    No. Unrelated. It’s related to the width and angle of the defect.
                    #ItsNotJustAHernia
                    www.BeverlyHillsHerniaCenter.com

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