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Scans to detect hernias

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  • Scans to detect hernias

    Hi all, I am a 48yo female living in Philadelphia. I am trying to figure out what scans (ultrasound/ mri etc) would best detect a hidden hernia. Also a recommendation for a hernia specialist in the Philly area would be great. I had a bilatersl
    inguinal hernia repaired 18 years ago and wondering if I sprang another (mini invisible) one or maybe scar tissue is suddenly going nuts because I can feel a really small hard ‘node’ under the surface near my right hip that definitely ‘reacts’ every time I try to lift semi heavy stuff, or bend over wrong, stand in one place too long, even wakes me up when sleeping sometimes. It’s sometimes painful and causes my right leg to feel heavy/tingly/weird. My previous hernia wasn’t painful but had a similar feeling when I’d push it back into its ‘socket’, only this one won’t go in a socket so to speak but hurts when I push and try to minimize it. Already had an X-ray and pelvic/low abdomen ultrasound which looked normal per my GP, and he couldn’t feel the ‘node’ I tried to point out. Thanks in advance for any insight.

  • #2
    fincarp,
    Look at the topic titled “How to instruct the radiologist to look for occult hernia in the MRI” on page 5. Dr. Towfigh provides the Dynamic MRI protocol she uses. There are other posts about imaging if you search this forum. I certainly know how difficult it it can be when imaging is misread. We know how our body feels! The right doctor will listen and help you find the solution. Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Thanks, will do! I would really just like to know what this is in case it suddenly takes a nosedive and becomes super painful. I’ve read about incarcerated/strangulated hernias and honestly that is my biggest fear. I’m generally an athletic and healthy person who only goes to the doctor under duress or for annual check ups but this has recently become a quality of life issue that I can’t ignore so I just need to know what it is. Knowledge is power, at least if I find out I’ll know whether it’s safe to exercise through the discomfort, since I’d prefer to tolerate some pain than undergo surgery which would likely just lead to more problems (my body is an active scar tissue producer).

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