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Losing touch with the patient - modern medicine

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  • Losing touch with the patient - modern medicine

    I came across this article just now and it seems very appropriate for the hernia repair field. It's about all of medicine but you can see how it applies.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/24/o...nard-lown.html



  • #2
    Thanks for the post.

    I have recommended this book many times on this website but here it goes again.

    https://www.amazon.com/Unaccountable...9600171&sr=1-1

    My current Dr takes days to answer a question and there Radiologists do not like speaking to patients and seem to short cut the findings.

    I did contact on of the sports hernia Dr's on Friday night or Saturday via his websites contact page and was shocked that he took the time out of his Saturday night to contact me and this morning he had sent me an email asking follow up questions. Talk about old school and so refreshing.

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    • #3
      I think that the doctors that are part of bigger practices/clinics have too much paperwork to do to maintain a personal relationship with their patients. Plus, in today's health care system, they probably have to account for all of their time, and each patient contact. It might also be part of today's training, to maintain a certain distance from their patients. And, typical of large efforts, division of labor is more prevalent. Specialists that only do a few things, and have to leave other tasks to other specialists. So that the insurance company codes will fit.

      I think I know who the sports hernia doctor is. He contacted me quickly also. It was odd and surprising, having been used to the day or more delays after every communication attempt, but after some conversation I realized that he was just being more true to his profession. He is very knowledgable.

      I notice that you seem to have decided that you have a sports hernia. I read your story in your other posts and it doesn't seem like it would be a typical sports hernia. You might be limiting your possibilities.

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      • #4
        Went to the local expert today. From looking at the MRI he stated that my current issue would be under the sports hernia umbrella. He advised live with it for 6 months trying to avoid movements like in sports of hockey, tennis or soccer. PT not a bad idea.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Good intentions View Post
          I think that the doctors that are part of bigger practices/clinics have too much paperwork to do to maintain a personal relationship with their patients. Plus, in today's health care system, they probably have to account for all of their time, and each patient contact. It might also be part of today's training, to maintain a certain distance from their patients. And, typical of large efforts, division of labor is more prevalent. Specialists that only do a few things, and have to leave other tasks to other specialists. So that the insurance company codes will fit.

          I think I know who the sports hernia doctor is. He contacted me quickly also. It was odd and surprising, having been used to the day or more delays after every communication attempt, but after some conversation I realized that he was just being more true to his profession. He is very knowledgable.

          I notice that you seem to have decided that you have a sports hernia. I read your story in your other posts and it doesn't seem like it would be a typical sports hernia. You might be limiting your possibilities.
          I am a big believer that you pick the doctor, not the hospital/health system. Hospitals/health systems probably want to discourage this.

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          • #6
            I agree with you on you pick the Dr but in reality with insurance companies dictating what dr(s) or healthcare system are approved by the insurance companies makes this next to impossible.

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            • #7
              Glad that he respinded to you! That rare. I saw a surgeon yesterday who said that he didnít see a her ja in the CT scan done in he ER last week. He also didnít feel one. He said it was probably a strain and to give it another month and return if pain persists.
              I am in so much pain. Abdominal pelvic and back I. Any sit too long. I canít stand too long. The pain gets worse as the day goes on. I am all more constipated in spite of colace and senator. Iíve been on amoxicillin for a week for a sinus infection ( 2nd roundo and both times made me constipated. I take probiotics every night and watch what I eat. I have been eating smaller meals because of pain and throbbing after bowel movements. Iím so tired of this. I hope it got better but am having a lot of anxiety and fear over this dibiltsting pain.
              mel

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              • #8
                Perhaps it should become standardized in the USA for all surgical patients to receive follow-up surveys after surgery? At 1 month, 3 month, 1 year, 3 year, 5 year, 10 years even, with questions about quality of life, pain or lack of, recurrence, followup, etc. This would surely be a treasure trove of revealing data. I know that some European countries are able to do this, which is often where the world gets the best large-scale study and medical data from simply because those countries make it easier to track patients and patient progress down the road.

                I can't help but wonder if the massive bureaucracy of insurance, billing, administrators, etc is the significant impediment to both direct follow-up and longer term follow-up becoming routine in most of the USA.

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                • #9
                  Chaunce I really like your idea. I agree.

                  Comment

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