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Dr. Towfigh - ilionguinal neurectomy

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  • Dr. Towfigh - ilionguinal neurectomy

    Dear Dr
    I have been diagnosed with potential ilionguinal nerve damage from a recent vasectomy. I have looked into options of neurectomy but I see a lot of negative posts and complications from this surgery. I was wondering if there is any information on the duration of the neuractomy? If you have this done what is prognosis 5,10,15 years after the procedure? I was quoted 85% success rate but that’s just for the procedure. I would like long term info if available please.

  • #2
    I would also like to invite anyone that has had a neurectomy to also comment on their experiences.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is a very interesting topic. Neurectomy is almost a standard procedure for mesh removal,with from one to three possible, as I understand it.

      It's easy to understand what it is, but not so easy to get details on what happens afterward.


      The topic has come up in many past threads. Use "site:herniatalk.com neurectomy" in Google to get a list. Good luck.



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      • #4
        I would hold off at least a year. The surgery that I think you are talking about is one of the treatments for PVP is called denervation of the spermatic cord. There are very few doctors performing this surgery. The other is Peri-Spermatic Cord Micro Cryoablation. Not sure what the outcomes are on either.

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        • #5
          I am actually looking at the pure neurectomy option of resecting the nerve and placing it in fat or muscle and any data around long term risks years down the road. Denervation and cryo are both very risky options and the nerves typically grow back and cause pain down the road

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          • #6
            Sorry you're going through this.

            Have you been to a major pain clinic (university or otherwise) and spoken with someone who has a lot of experience managing chronic pain patients? If not then that might be a good step. Ultimately it'd be ideal to find someone who has worked successfully with similar issues to your own.

            What does the quoted 85% "success rate" really mean? And what does the other 15% look like? What are the sample sizes they are working with?

            Neurectomy may help but it is ultimately unpredictable, it is not a guaranteed way to remove pain. The most obvious example is people who lose a limb and then experience phantom limb pain despite the fact there are no nerves or limb to feel the pain. A groin neurectomy also can have other unintended side effects that you can read about on these forums and elsewhere.

            Dr David Chen at UCLA has substantial experience with neurectomy and may be a good resource for tracking down knowledge and study data. You might try looking around on NIH as well for outcome studies.

            ​​​​​​​It might be wise to try various less invasive approaches first. Repeat nerve blocks, ketamine transfusion therapy, longterm vitamin C and alpha-lipoic acid, etc etc

            Comment

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