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  • Long term recovery

    Is anybody aware of detailed publications on LONG-TERM recovery after an 'Open' I. H. procedure? The posts here are very useful, but necessarily brief. I'm not the only person looking for detailed information on the long-term recovery process-not just at 4 weeks or 8 weeks, but what the patient can reasonably expect at six months, and one year, and two years after the procedure. If you have long-term plans (and who doesn't ?) you need to know at what point you can assume it's safe to proceed with them, without wondering "Should I wait another couple of months, or maybe six months before I do this?". For instance, being out of the country for an extended period, or maybe starting serious training again. This is obviously a critical topic, but I haven't found anything in print that addresses it. Statements such as "you should be healed up by this point" aren't especially useful.
    I would like to know what (presumably) will be going on at the procedure site in six months or a year, or two years, and how much freedom of action is reasonable as a result. I am 50 something, in good health, live a very simple life, work on my feet all day, and I've been a runner all my life. Can people with a similar background expect to be back at full speed in the future, without damaging the surgery site? Any thoughts on this will be appreciated. Thanks.

  • #2
    I lsecond the question

    Comment


    • #3
      Dave Graham could you please post that publication ? are you taking about No-mesh Inguinal Hernia Repair with Continuous Absorbable Sutures ? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2702909/

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      • #4
        Dog-No, maybe I wasn't clear. I'm looking for long term information (not just 4-8 weeks) about what the patient can reasonably expect after standard open inguinal hernia surgery. Hard to find, but we need to know what can reasonably be expected at six months, and a year and so forth.

        Comment


        • #5
          read below my friend
          .
          Dave Graham

          This is a very difficult question to answer as each surgeon that works on inguinal hernias would answer it differently.
          Also clearly every patient is different and every patient’s anatomy is unique.

          For me and my patients, after 8 weeks I expect that histologically the hernia is completely repaired and there should be no further disability associated with this problem. Therefore, there should be no restrictions after 8 weeks of recovery from an inguinal hernia repair.


          Jonathan Yunis MD FACS
          Center for Hernia Repair
          Sarasota, Florida

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          • #6

            After a open non-mesh hernia repair the patient can expect to need pain pills for 2 to 3 days. Then switch over to Advil or Tylenol. Ice packs are very helpful. Compression shorts can also be very helpful. The patient can do all of his daily activities including lifting 25 pounds, driving a car, going upstairs, sex, and long walks. At three weeks the patient will have 70% of the final strength. At that point in time it is safe to start aerobic exercises. At six weeks the patient will have 90% of the final strength. And at that point in time can slowly return to sports.

            I hope that the above is helpful.
            Regards.
            Bill Brown, M.D.
            510 793 2404 Office
            650 703 9694 Cell

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dave Graham View Post
              Is anybody aware of detailed publications on LONG-TERM recovery after an 'Open' I. H. procedure?
              You've probably described in this one of your other posts but are you talking about open mesh implantation or open suture repair?

              I posted a link to another forum in my "Good Stories" topic. There might be more information over there. It's post #30. Good luck.

              https://www.herniatalk.com/6883-succ...-stories/page2

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              • #8
                Good intentions HI ..LINK Doesn't work ?

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                • #9
                  So I'm interested in who wrote and did those surgeries in that paper on continuous absorbable sutures. Alas, it seems like it must be someone in the UK? Here's my thing: I am a female with an inguinal hernia and although I've seen many other females with this on other boards all of the literature addresses it as if it is a male only thing--there aren't trusses made for females--etc. Doctors on this board--I know it's a small percentage of us (3%) but that's still a lot of people who have to continually be told this is usually near our nonexistent scrotums. The other thing: I used to be a journalist--I know how to research things--I don't think I've ever researched anything as throughly as trying to find a surgeon who will do no mesh hernia surgery (and I am interested in the absorbable suture--but not wedded to it) who will take my insurance and who my insurance will either accept or reimburse for. I'm in the midwest which is a wasteland but willing to travel. What doctors will use the absorbable sutures in the U.S.? This paper made some sense to me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Fill the person who does that surgery in the United States would be dr Tomas... desarda technique

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dill
                      Dr Tomas doesn't take insurance ..close to you will be
                      Jonathan Yunis MD FACS
                      Center for Hernia Repair
                      Sarasota, Florida...has great feedback's..

                      Great choice would be for you to have a female doctor for you like founder of this forum could a great choice.
                      http://www.bevaerlyhillsherniacenter.com/
                      DR. SHIRIN TOWFIGH

                      Bill Brown, M.D.
                      510 793 2404 Office
                      650 703 9694 Cell
                      I believe you will truly like this doctor..you can even call him on his cell :}

                      Comment

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